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Panchadashi Lesson - A0728: Practical - Gaining Knowledge

Panchadashi
Module - A
Unit - A07
Lesson - A0728: Practical - Gaining Knowledge
By Raja Subramaniyan

How do we gain any specific knowledge?
Collection of information
Select the appropriate sense organs
Use the sense organs efficiently
Collect all the relevant information
Convert the information into knowledge
Process the information by comparing with the previous knowledge (stored in the memory)
Apply all the relevant information with respect to related details like the time, space and the context in which the information is collected
Use logic and discriminatory sense to convert the filtered information in to knowledge.

Let us apply the above stated steps to see how we identify a person from an old group photo.

Collection of information

Select the appropriate sense organs: Use the Eyes.

Use the sense organs efficiently: Since the photo is taken a long time ago, see properly, may be with a magnifying lens if required.

Collect all the relevant information: Read when, where and on what occasion the photograph was taken.

Convert the information into knowledge

Process the information by comparing with previous knowledge (stored in the memory): Do you recall any familiar face?

Apply all the relevant information with respect to related details like the time, space and the context in which the information is collected: Recall the names of all the persons whom you know, who will fit with the data collected with respect to age, venue, occasion etc.

Use logic and discriminatory sense to convert the filtered information into knowledge: It is not possible to name a person who has not born when the photograph was taken. Use such logic.

As result of following the above steps we can correctly identify the person OR make a mistake depending on how well we do these steps. Both Collection of Information AND Conversion into knowledge are equally important but Conversion into knowledge MUST be based on the information received from the primary sense organ, namely eyes in the above example.

Four Types of Meaning

A word can have any one or more meanings depending on the context.

Example: Mango

Type 1: Direct Meaning (Mango is the name of a fruit)
This is the most often used meaning of the word 'Mango'.

Type 2: Figurative meaning
In a computer game of collecting mangoes this word may refer to the score

Type 3: Situational meaning
It may mean a ripe fruit if one wants to eat it or it may mean the unripe mango if one wants it for cooking.

Type 4: Appropriate meaning
"Can you eat a full mango?" Here it means the edible parts of the mango and not the skin and seed parts of the mango.
"Buy me a full mango". Here it means the entire mango and not just the edible part

Type 4 has following three sub types, which are explained with the example:
"It is time for my medicine"

Subtype 1: Total Negation
Depending on the situation, one should negate the entire direct meaning of a word and take a totally different but related word to be the meaning.
It might be possible that it means liquor and not medicine.

Sub Type 2: Imputed Meaning
Depending on the situation, one should include an additional meaning along with what is conveyed
May be the person is indicating that he wants to take the medicine AND go to sleep, which may also mean, "Leave me alone. I want to sleep".

Sub Type 3: Part Negation and Part Acceptance
Depending on the situation, one should include only certain parts of the meaning of the word and exclude certain other parts.
May be we are supposed to bring the regular medicines excluding the sleeping pill since the patient is already feeling sleepy.

It requires a high degree of intelligence to figure out what exactly is the meaning of the sentence. Normally one should take the Direct Meaning of a sentence (Type 1). If we find any contradiction in the meaning then we should explore the other types and figure out which type of meaning should be taken.

The level of intelligence of a person determines his understanding level. Suppose you tell your guest 'eat the full mango' and if he attempts to eat the skin and seed, it shows his level of intelligence.

Unless a person is highly intelligent it is not possible to understand, the correct meaning at all times.

Example: You can educate your not-so-intelligent guest on what you mean by 'full mango' and may be next time he will eat only the edible portion. However, it is not possible for you to guide him at all times.

Imagine you are visiting his house and he gives you mango juice. After drinking it you ask him, 'Can you give me one more glass' and he gives you an empty glass, what will be your reactions?

The bottom line is such persons cannot get the right knowledge in most situations.

Although intelligent, many of us are conditioned to see the wrong picture of ourselves. Therefore, it is increasingly difficult to see the right picture.

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